The Role of NHRIs in (Post) Conflict

NHRIs work is even more important in (Post) Conflict, where human rights abuses are more widespread and societies divided. In such cases, strong, independent and trusted independent human rights actors are required to support individuals, human rights defenders and civil society organisations, promoting a culture of rights.

With sufficient capacity, and given their broad mandate, NHRIs can take a holistic approach towards addressing human rights violations in (post) conflict situations, by:

  • monitoring and documenting human rights abuses in (post) conflict, including violations to the rights of women and girls;
  • advising governments to help place human rights at the heart of conflict prevention, management and resolution initiatives, including reconstruction and peace-building;
  • engaging strategically with international and regional bodies to help reinforce their efforts to promote and protect human rights in (post) conflict;
  • engaging strategically with international and regional bodies to help reinforce their efforts to promote and protect human rights in (post) conflict;
  • promoting a culture of rights and supporting individuals, human rights defenders and civil society organisations to enhance the respect for human rights, democracy and the rule of law;
  • acting as bridge between international/ regional and national actors;
  • delivering public statements and reports, in cooperation with media, to address urgent human rights violations;
  • using research to highlight and address human rights concerns.